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A Mountain
in the "Sea"

View of the Bocca Soglia
[Ph.MA Benedetti]

Of Granite And Schist...

It is the mountain, which gives to Corsica its physiognomy of character and of nobleness with about 1700 summits which go from 300 to 2710 m of altitude. It shapes two Corsica of different nature and area, by spliting them by a depression which goes from Ile Rousse to the neighborhood of Ghisonaccia and which crosses Ponte Leccia then Corte.

IN THE NORTH-EAST
A first chain of crests, in the north-east of this depression, reaches its highest point of 1767m at the Monte San Petrone, goes from the extreme north of the isle, that is to say the Corsican Cape and goes on until the Fiumorbo river.
More in the east, a second chain which is slightly arched and less high for its highest summits - the Monte Olmelli - reaches 1285 m, extends.
The main summits of this first Corsica of schist nature, said to be " l'En Deša des Monts" (in comparison with Italy) - or eastern coast- are from North to East:
la Cime du e Folicce (1305m), le Monte Stello (1307m), le Monte Asto (1535m) and the Monte San Petrone already named.

IN THE WEST
The crystalline relief of this second Corsica in the west of this depression, called "l'Au dela des Monts", sets on a much vaster area, in a succession of granitic massives.

Certain massives seem to plunge in the sea; with their sharp ridges, they divide up contrasting valleys from where the most highest summits of Corsica rise up.
Uomo di Cagna [Ph. MA Benedetti ] Paglia Orba

We do not resist to the pleasure of naming some of them (from North-West to South South-East) because their names are as bearers of dreams as their vision: the Monte Cinto - the isle's roof - (2710m), the Paglia Orba, the Monte Rotondo, the Monte d'Oro, the Monte Renoso, the Punta di A cappella, the Monte Incudine, the Aiguilles of Bavella, the Punta di a Vacca Morta or even the Omo di Cagna...

Corsican Nature there is also :

A Few books to Go Further....

 

 

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